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But as we have already seen, falling asleep is sometimes not far away from falling to one's death. A popular example in the English language is the traditional Rock-a-bye Baby , which in its most common version goes like:. Although the rocking cradle and the soothing wind in this song create the image of a classic lullaby, the last two verses present a vision of serious threat similar to the fate of Jack and Jill. This again quite eloquently represents the instability of all things and that there is no guarantee for an easygoing future.

In the German traditional Hoppe, hoppe Reiter , sung to children while they playfully imitate to ride a horse, the rider has to beware not to fall down and get devoured by ravens.

Complete Poems by Edith Södergran

A similar case can be seen in the famous Humpty Dumpty song. For example in the 18 th century traditional Ladybird, Ladybird, Fly Away Home a mother is informed that her house is on fire and all her children have died in the flames except for one. These rather blackened verses are still often recited when a ladybird is found sitting on ones body. A different, but also quite interesting family situation is described in There was an Old Woman who lived in a shoe. In this merry rhyme about domestic violence, the mother uses to feed her children poorly and to beat them before she sends them to sleep.


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If one takes the time to browse through extensive collections of songs and rhymes, one also frequently comes across very interesting social messages. In addition to their mere entertaining value or to scare children, these songs often turn out to be very witty pieces of literature. They many times reflect about threats and social problems such as domestic violence or poverty.

Poesi I-VI (Swedish Edition)

This is truly a rather depressing outlook for a little child, however it has been a very well-known song since at least and is still popular today. An English translation goes like: Pray, little child, pray! Tomorrow the Swede will come. Tomorrow Oxenstierna the Swedish state chancellor will come, who will teach the little child how to pray. There are even songs that offer glimpses on the absurd and feature traces of the existential nihilistic void experienced by numerous philosophers. An especially interesting case is the Norwegian song Det bor en gammel baker Engl.

There lives an old baker. It tells the story of an old baker who lives alone on a tiny island. He has so many cakes and other baked goods that he is tired of eating all of it himself. Unfortunately no ship ever lands on his island, so he is forced to gobble everything alone and cry about his misery. The song ends with the old baker lying dead in a pile of cake and pastry. What makes this song even more interesting is the fact that it is told in such a mundane manner.

We really had an exciting day with tons of people playing at our booth. Normally there are about people going in and out on Thursdays from but today there were only 5 people and one left around So I thought this week there will be no boardgame night. I was kind of ready to leave but instead of leaving, I took out my Ogoola Karuta games from my bag and layed them on the table. The English karuta or the Swedish? I tried to explain the game as simple as possible, inspired by another game player at Skuggspel named Vilhelm.

So this is how I explained the game:. A part of what you are going to hear will be the information on the cards you see here. Be fast!

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It was so fun to watch them fight to win! They were playing karuta almost as wild as the Japanese, kyogi karuta geeks. It was exciting for both the players and the watchers. So another young man popped up to play. This man is Taurus. Taurus then played with Marc, then invited or even insisted that Simon another young student at the game department play against him. Simon was veeery very skeptic about the game.

He thought that this would be a boring game. But to our surprise and also to his surprise, the game was extremely exciting and fun! The intensity and focus. It was like when the kids at Atheneskolan were screaming when they played the game. Simon said that he could not imagine that this game would be fun until he played it himself. Your decisions, actions and most important your very existence is important, makes a difference and has meaning.

But is this always the case? What happens if poetic justice is not only violated, but people start to die and suffer randomly and the prospects of an adequate reward are erased? What about children in literature who suffer severe accidents, burn to death, get beaten by their parents or die in solitude?

Images like these can open the abyss to the ultimate conceivable waste land: life has no intrinsic meaning and value at all.

Swedish: "eller är min vilja till, mest till besvär?

This is a prospect that may appear worrying to quite a lot of people, however a lot of songs quite snugly fit into this context. As stated before, calamities and disasters are nothing unusual in texts for children. A fairly obvious reason is that violence is frequently used as a stylistic device in order to enhance tension and suspense. Another usual motive is the aim to convey an educational, instructive message and to prepare children for potential dangers in life. A lot of classic fairy-tales or cautionary tales such as the famous German Struwwelpeter Engl.

ipdwew0030atl2.public.registeredsite.com/105085-how-to-put.php Therefore nursery rhymes are often used to make children behave and follow their parents advice e. But violent acts and even dying are often also presented in a trivial or comic manner. The popular nursery rhyme about Jack and Jill quoted at the beginning tells the story of two characters going up a hill and having a severe accident. And there is more to this cautionary song than merely the vision about falling down a hill. It can also be interpreted as a reminder or the instability of all things and that life can indeed end violently at any moment and in unexpected ways.

But Jack and Jill are by far not the only protagonists in nursery rhymes who find themselves in this situation. First we have to keep in mind that lullabies are supposed to sooth children and to help them fall asleep.

But as we have already seen, falling asleep is sometimes not far away from falling to one's death. A popular example in the English language is the traditional Rock-a-bye Baby , which in its most common version goes like:. Although the rocking cradle and the soothing wind in this song create the image of a classic lullaby, the last two verses present a vision of serious threat similar to the fate of Jack and Jill. This again quite eloquently represents the instability of all things and that there is no guarantee for an easygoing future.

In the German traditional Hoppe, hoppe Reiter , sung to children while they playfully imitate to ride a horse, the rider has to beware not to fall down and get devoured by ravens. A similar case can be seen in the famous Humpty Dumpty song. For example in the 18 th century traditional Ladybird, Ladybird, Fly Away Home a mother is informed that her house is on fire and all her children have died in the flames except for one.

These rather blackened verses are still often recited when a ladybird is found sitting on ones body.